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By Peter Dunn aka Pete the Planner®

Everywhere you look, you see another article about how the workplace has changed, post-Covid. Workers want flexibility, they want higher pay, and they want to work where they want to work. You never quite know how workplace cultural revolutions start, but if this ends up being one, I wouldn’t be surprised.

The underlying message in all of these studies and surveys is workers are asking for their non-work life to be acknowledged and respected. Frankly, they’ve always asked for this, but the pandemic gave further credence to the need. We are not on this planet to work; instead, we are on this planet to live. Yet work remains the great facilitator of life. It provides the financial resources, and for some people, a healthy purpose. Well, that’s what people think is happening. The truth is a bit more jarring.

Americans are failing financially. I thought about writing “Americans have been failed financially,” but I’m not sure the onus particularly matters. Retirement readiness numbers continue to suffer, consumer debt is an issue once again, and housing and transportation costs are at all-time highs. How can a person leverage work to provide their best life, if the best life part of the equation isn’t going so well?

The answer is direction.

What a person wants and how they provide it to themselves have been separated by a frustrating chasm since the dawn of humanity. But throw-in unprecedented financial stress, pent-up consumer demand, a reinvigorated YOLO (You Only Live Once) attitude, and you’ve got yourself millions of Americans who’re disappointed in their financial progress.

People need direction.

If your organization is already the means in which your employees receive economic resources, it makes sense to provide necessary and appropriate direction alongside of their pay. That’s the essence of financial wellness. By providing your employees access to a team of financial problem solvers, you’re helping them realize the financial realities they’ve always aspired to.

Want to get rid of those pesky student loans? A trained financial wellness practitioner and can help put a plan together to accomplish that.

Want to make sure your housing decision coincides with the rest of your financial plan? An unbiased financial wellness expert can do that.

Want to create a natural path to retirement for your workers by removing the current, unique impediments in every one of their lives? That’s exactly what effective financial wellness programming accomplishes.

Part of the anguish and frustration of “re-entering” the work place involves people coming to terms with what they actually want their employer to provide. Financial wellness bridges that gap. It increases job satisfaction by optimizing the compensation’s impact on employees’ lives. It decreases stress which can often lead to job dissatisfaction. And it ultimately helps employees solve the very personal financial challenges which can stagnate an otherwise positive outlook.

Your people have several of the ingredients which can lead to a successful financial life; now it’s time to not only provide them recipes, but the chefs who can prepare the desired dish, as well.

If you’re interested in improving employee satisfaction by furthering the means in which an employee can improve their finances, click here to learn more. It’s time to help provide more direction in your people’s financial lives. You both benefit when that happens.

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